The explication of eliots poem the love song of j alfred prufrock

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But though I have wept and fasted, wept and prayed, Though I have seen my head [grown slightly bald] brought in upon a platter, I am no prophet—and here's no great matter; I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker, And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker, And in short, I was afraid.

Do I dare to eat a peach? The Love Song of J. As mentioned earlier, he seems to be longing for the attention of a single person, presumably, a woman, asking "Is it perfume from a dress - That makes me so digress? World War 1 was on the horizon and the struggles for power were beginning to alter the way people lived and thought and loved.

Alfred Prufrock, by T. Alfred Prufrock is a shifting, repetitive monologue, the thoughts of a mature male as he searches for love and meaning in an uncertain, twilight world.

The smoke as a player in and of itself, animalistic but not malevolent, is an interesting characteristic. And I have known the arms already, known them all— Arms that are braceleted and white and bare But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair! He can't risk eating a peach for fear of upsetting stomach or bowels.

Furthermore, fragmentation is a Modernist technique, which had not since been seen before in literature, and was probably not very well received by the high circle of literary elite.

His subsequent repetitions of "known" exclude the Biblical sense of carnal knowledge. Alfred Prufrock is lines long and is mostly loose rhyming, that is, there is no consistent rhyme scheme and no regular pattern to the rhythm.

The "Love Song" of the title is ironic since the eponymous character is isolated, timid, anti-heroic, middle aged, and unromantic. This shifting, repetitive poem is a parody of a love song; it flows then stumbles and hesitates its way through the life of a middle aged male who can't decide where he stands in the world.

It is just the trauma of voicing aloud these thoughts that is stopping him. I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be; Am an attendant lord, one that will do To swell a progress, start a scene or two, Advise the prince; no doubt, an easy tool, Deferential, glad to be of use, Politic, cautious, and meticulous; Full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse; At times, indeed, almost ridiculous— Almost, at times, the Fool.

Note the emptiness of the world: Michelangelo, Hamlet, Lazarus, Orsino, the speaker of "To His Coy Mistress" would have plunged into the waves to hear the song of the mermaids and to drown in the pleasures that comes with life's embraces. The second defining characteristic of this poem is its use of fragmentation and juxtaposition.

The kinds of imagery Eliot uses also suggest that something new can be made from the ruins: His use of an epigraph heightens the reward and demonstrates that J.

Like all great works of art, it remains open to new interpretations and can mean lots of different things to different readers. This poem is in the public domain. Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question Gateways to World Literature: Here, Prufrock fantasises that he has had a change of heart, and gone to speak to the woman at the centre of the poem, picturing himself as Lazarus thus showing both academic and biblical learning come back from the dead, i.

Scholars, however, have been undecided on the true nature of what the first line means. Prufrock — the women talking of Michelangelo. The world is crumbling and with it comes the fragmentation of human sensibility. Roger Mitchell wrote, on this poem: This line also serves to enforce the idea of keeping conversation light, airy, and without feeling.

The city is half-deserted. The frequent pressing of "And should I then presume" reflects his own self-doubt.Poetry Analysis: The Love Song of J.

Alfred Prufrock, by T.S. Eliot. Arguably the best known English poem of the 20th century, "Prufrock" is an interior monologue. This video introduces T.S. Eliot's poem, 'The Love Song of J.

Alfred Prufrock.' It outlines the general setup of the poem, its enigmatic lead. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Questions and Answers.

The Question and Answer section for The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock - Let us go then, you and I.

Let us go then, you and I.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot

Let us go then, you and I This poem is in the public domain. Published in This poem is in the public domain.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot. Born in Missouri on September 26, joeshammas.com and J. Alfred Prufrock One of the first true modernist poems, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is a shifting, repetitive monologue, the thoughts of a mature male as he searches for love and meaning in an uncertain, twilight world.

This video introduces T.S. Eliot's poem, 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.' It outlines the general setup of the poem, its enigmatic lead character and its stylistic characteristics.

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The explication of eliots poem the love song of j alfred prufrock
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